Biographical Notes

 

John Aitchison (1828-1912)

 

The son of a joiner, he was a tailor and clothier, and in 1881 he was described as a clothier master. In 1891 he was a Registrar of Births, Deaths and Marriages which indicated that he was a respected member of the community.

 

He had six children, two girls and four boys. Only two of them, William Hamilton Aitchison (1866-1948) and Alexander (Alec) Gilbert Aitchison (1867- ?), married and only William had children and then only one, Katharine Hamilton Aitchison (1903-97). John therefore had only one grandchild. The two girls, Catherine Brydie Aitchison (1861-1948) and Isabella Aitchison (1862-1941), did not work outside the home. The oldest boy, John Aitchison (1864- ?), trained as a lawyer. The family sent him to Canada because he had an alcohol problem but he returned uncured and lived in Glasgow. William began as an apprentice to a clothier, his father's occupation. He then joined the merchant navy and eventually became a ship’s captain. Alec was a tailor. He spent 16 years in the Scots Guards first at home and then in South Africa in 1900-02. He left the army in September 1903 and did not have a steady job thereafter. David Aitchison (1869-1920) trained as a tailor but was committed to a mental institution as a young man and spent the rest of his life institutionalised.

 

William Hamilton Aitchison (1866-1948)

 

He began as an apprentice to a clothier, his father's occupation. He later joined the merchant navy. He was a seaman (first mate) in 1891 and obtained his master mariner’s certificate in 1894. He eventually became a captain. He started his career on sailing ships and went to Australia many times. He finished on steam ships.

 

He had only one child, Katharine Hamilton Aitchison (1903-97), who was a doctor. She married Charles William Odling-Smee (1904-90).

 

Barnard Bayley (c1738-1819)

 

He was a watch and clock maker who lived and worked in Bridgewater Square on the northern edge of the City (just north of the present day Barbican). (One of his signed clocks was on sale at Phillips in 1998.) He was a freeman of the City of London and a member of the Company of Wheelwrights.

 

He married three times and had at least eight children with his first wife Mary. His second wife had four children from earlier marriages but they did not have any children together. Five of his children survived him. The two boys who survived, Barnard Bayley (b. 1763) and Thomas Bayley (b. 1760s or 1770s and d. c1848), were also watch and clock makers. The oldest daughter, Mary Bayley (c1766-1821) married a watch case maker, William Watson (1770-1857) as her second husband. (Her first husband was a coach painter.) The youngest daughter, Jane Kezia Rebecca Bayley (1778-1821) emigrated to the US with her husband Robert Henderson (1768-1817). Barnard Bayley (c1738-1819) had many grandchildren. Some of his descendants lived abroad: in addition to his daughter Jane Kezia Rebecca and her family, his grandson Barnard Bayley (1790-1832), son of his son Thomas, lived in the US, and John Nevill who married his granddaughter Martha Bayley (b. 1789), the daughter of Thomas, emigrated with his children to Australia after Martha died.

 

John Annesley Brownrigg (1832-1891)

 

He was born in Ireland and practiced as a doctor in England. He married Louisa Marian Key (1846-1931) and they had three sons and five daughters. One of their daughters, Hilda Brownrigg (1870-1966), was a bridesmaid at the marriage of her mother’s cousin, Emma Mary Hahn (1872-1911). John’s nephew, Gerald Worthington Brownrigg (1867-), emigrated to Argentina.

 

Alice Mary Buckton (1867-1944)

 

She was the oldest child of George Bowdler Buckton (1818-1905). She was a published poet and wrote a Christmas mystery play Eager Heart. She became interested in the spiritual and creative movements in Glastonbury and moved there in 1913. She helped to guide visitors round the sacred sites of Glastonbury and was a founder member of the first series of Glastonbury festivals. (http://bucktonfamily.co.uk/interesting-bucktons/alice-mary-buckton.html)

 

Eveleen Buckton (1872-1962)

 

She was the fifth child and daughter of George Bowdler Buckton (1818-1905). She was an artist who worked in water colours and woodcuts. She exhibited in many places, including her own exhibition of water colours, etchings and sculpture at the Arlington Gallery, Old Bond Street.

 

George Bowdler Buckton (1818-1905)

 

He was a scientist who was elected a FRS in 1857. His early research was in chemistry, some of it in collaboration with William Odling (1829-1921). He later turned to entomology on which he published many books.

 

He married Mary Anne Odling (1831-1927), only daughter of George Odling (1795-1872) and sister of William Odling. They had seven children of whom six, five girls and one boy, survived to adulthood. Four of the girls followed creative pursuits. Alice Mary Buckton (1867-1944) was a poet and playwright. Jessie Maria Buckton (1868-1954) worked in woodcuts. Maud Elizabeth Buckton (1869-1962) was a stained glass artist. Eveleen Buckton (1872-1962) worked in water colours and woodcuts. The other daughter, Florence Emily Buckton (1870-1931) was the only one to marry. George’s son, William Woodyer Buckton (1875-1940) was an engineer.

 

Ebenezer Butler (1707-74)

 

He was a grocer in Warminster where he was active in the independent church, having been baptized by Dissenters. He had eight daughters, three of whom married merchants based in Wapping and Shadwell: Rachel (1733-87) married John Thompson, Susannah married William Hubbard, and Jane (died 1818-20) married Gregory Seale. All three couples were Dissenters.

 

George Edward Cotterill (1839-1913)

 

He was the headmaster of schools in Grahamstown, Woking and Weybridge, and an assistant master at Brighton College. He was subsequently Rector of Idlicote, Warwickshire. In his younger days he played first class cricket. He had seven children.

 

David Goodall (1799-1867)

 

The son of a coachmaker, he was a tinsmith in Edinburgh. He had three children who survived to adulthood, all girls. The older two, Elizabeth Goodall (b. c1834) and Janet Goodall (b. c1835) were house servants in 1851. The youngest, Mary Goodall (c1840-1909), married David Henderson (1838-93), a copperplate printer. They had eleven children (see David Henderson).

 

John Anderson Graham (1861-1942)

 

He was a Scottish missionary who founded a school for destitute Anglo-Indian children in the hill station of Kalimpong, West Bengal, in 1900. It became known as Dr Graham's Homes after his death in 1942. He was elected Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland in 1931. The third of his four daughters, Katherine Bunty Graham, married Arthur Norman Odling in 1920. Bunty and Norman subsequently lived in Kalimpong and managed the production and sale of traditional handicrafts.

 

Francis Green (1748-1815)

 

He was a clockmaker, being admitted to the Worshipful Company of Clockmakers in 1772. He was made one of the “Sworn Brokers of the City of London” in 1778. He lived in the City, Lambeth, Camberwell, Denmark Hill and Dorking. He had eight children, three boys and five girls. He and his descendants are described in a private publication of his descendant Francis Green (1853-1942), Francis Green of Denmark Hill, Surrey, and his Descendants (Devizes, second edition 1928).

 

George Wade Green (1785-1868)

 

He was a clergyman in various parishes in Southern England before purchasing the Court Henry estate in Carmarthenshire in 1830. He and his older sister Charlotte married a sister and brother, Mary Ann and John (later Sir John) Key. George and Mary Ann had six sons and six daughters.

One of his grandsons, Francis Green (1853-1942), as well as being a solicitor, was a historian of county families in Cardigan, Carmarthen and Pembroke. He published a history of his own family, Francis Green of Denmark Hill, Surrey, and his Descendants (Devizes, second edition 1928), which contains much genealogical detail.

 

Harriet Green (1783-1855)

 

She married Edward Beaumont Venn and had eleven children. The youngest, Margaretta Elfrida Venn (1825-91) married her cousin John Mellish Kay Hahn (1828-1907).

 

Theophilus Green (1718-83)

 

He was a weaver, becoming a free member of the Weavers’ Company in 1740. He lived in the City of London. He had seven children, although three of them, all named Theophilus, died before they were three.

 

Charles Theophilus Hahn (1870-1930)

 

He trained for the ministry (Church of England) at Leeds Clergy College in 1892-93 and was a curate in 1893-1907 in various parishes, first in Sydenham, Kent, then in West Yorkshire. He was appointed vicar in Dewsbury Moor in 1907 but stayed only one year. He went to South Africa as a missionary in 1908 and had various positions in Zululand, among them Canon of St Peter’s Cathedral in Vryheid and Archdeacon of Eshowe. He painted over 200 watercolours of flora in Zululand; the collection is preserved in South Africa. He left South Africa in 1917 and, after a brief period as vicar of Pontefract, he was a Church Army Chaplain in France. While in England he changed his name in 1917 from Hahn to Headley, the name of the village where he grew up, in response to anti-German hysteria. He returned to Southern Africa after the war and spent three years in Cape Town attached to the cathedral and diocesan office and five years in South West Africa. His last two years were in England. He married Marion Forrester (1872-1955) in 1897 and she was with him in Yorkshire and Southern Africa; they had no children.

 

Emma Mary Hahn (1872-1911)

 

She married George Smee Odling (1873-1926) in July 1902. In October 1902 George changed his surname from Odling to Odling-Smee to comply with the will of his uncle Alfred Hutchison Smee (1841-1901) who left George a considerable part of his estate. Emma and George had three children: Charles William Odling-Smee (1904-90), Alfred John Odling-Smee (1906-87) and Barbara Odling-Smee (1910-88). Emma died suddenly, aged 39, of ptomaine poisoning contracted from something she ate when out motoring.

 

Frederick Hahn (1728-1806)

 

He was born in Germany but lived in London most of his life, being granted a Patent of Denization, a form of permanent residency, in 1767. He had a sugar refining business, a field in which Germans were prominent. Together with other sugar refiners, many of them German, in 1782 he formed the Phoenix Fire Assurance Company, of which he remained a director until he died. His sister, Louisa Hahn (1729-1816), married another German-born businessman in London, John Christian Schreiber (1737-1807). As they had no children, their considerable wealth was left to Frederick’s children.

 

Frederick and his wife Barbara Pfahler (1734-1813) had three children who lived to adulthood, and at least nine children altogether. Of the three, the only son, George Henry Hahn (1770-1846), joined his father’s sugar business and eventually inherited it. One daughter, Louisa Hahn (1762-1833), married a barrister, George Daniell (1760-1833), and had four children. The other daughter, Mary Ann Hahn (1758-1829) did not marry.

 

George Henry Hahn (1770-1846)

 

He inherited his father’s sugar refining business which he ran with his partners until the partnership was dissolved in 1821. He had other business interests, including the British mining companies in Mexico. He was a shareholder of at least one of them, the United Mexican Mining Company. He was appointed a lieutenant of the City of London in 1837.

 

He and his wife, Mary Sophia Green (1787-1870), had twelve children, six boys and six girls. In line with their father’s interests, five of the boys worked in mining companies in Mexico. Two of them died there and a third died at sea on his way back from Mexico. Two of the girls married: Mary Sophia Hahn (1818-55) married her cousin Sir Kingsmill Grove Key (1815-99), an engineer and businessman, and Rosina Sarah Hahn (1822-91) married Edmund Woodthorpe (1814-87), an architect and surveyor. Between them they had six children. As two of the boys also had children, George Henry and Mary Sophia Hahn had ten grandchildren altogether.

 

George Henry Hahn (1812-39), Francis Edmund Hahn (1814-94) and William Edwin Hahn (1816-52)

 

These three sons of George Henry Hahn (1770-1846) all worked in Mexico in mining companies. George Henry went first in the late 1820s and remained until he died in Durango in 1839. William Edwin joined him in 1835 and stayed, apart from visits to England. He died in 1852 at sea on his way to England. Francis Edmund was in Mexico in the 1840s but spent the greater part of his life in England where he married in 1859. He did not have any children.

 

John Frederick Hahn (1809-65)

 

He worked in mining companies in Mexico from his early 20s on. He died in Mexico City in 1865 of erysipelas of the head. For the last 20 years or so of his life he operated iron ore mines and works with one or two partners in the region of Zimapan. At least two of his brothers, William Edwin Hahn (1816-52) and Theophilus Sigismund Hahn (1824-1907), worked with him for some of this time.

 

He married Jane Constance Davidson (1829-1905) in Mexico City in 1857. They had two children, Frederick John Alexander Hahn (1860-1912) and Mary Constance Xaviera Hahn (1864-1913). They returned to England with their mother after their father died. Frederick was a barrister in London. He married Henrietta Webber and they had one daughter, Dorothy Louise Hahn (1893-1976). Mary married Ernest Alfred Snape, a doctor in London. They had no children.

 

John Mellish Kay Hahn (1828-1907)

 

He was the youngest and the only one of the six sons of George Henry Hahn (1770-1846) who did not go to Mexico. He was an architect. He married his cousin Margaretta Elfrida Venn (1825-91) and, after she died, Eliza Lucas (1832-1911). He did not have any children.

 

Louisa Theophilia Hahn (1815-58), Henrietta Frederica Hahn (1820-1901), Emma Decima Hahn(1827-1905) and Charlotte Marian Hahn (1833-1902)

 

These four daughters of George Henry Hahn (1770-1846) did not marry. They stayed close to the family, living at various times with their parents, when they were still alive, their brothers and each other. They travelled on the Continent where Charlotte painted many scenes in watercolour. She died in Switzerland and Emma Decima died in Menton, France.

 

 Theophilus Sigismund Hahn (1824-1907)

 

He trained as an engineer and joined his brother John Frederick Hahn in 1850 in the Zimapan region of Mexico where they owned and operated iron mines and works. After John Frederick died in 1865, Theophilus returned to England. He married Helen Maxfield Walters (1834-97) in 1869 and in 1872 bought Headley Grange in Hampshire which was the family home until he died. He and Helen had two children, Charles Theophilus Hahn (1870-1930) and Emma Mary Hahn (1872-1911). Charles Theophilus was a priest who served in parishes in Yorkshire and Southern Africa (Zululand, Cape Town and South West Africa). Emma Mary married George Smee Odling (1873-1926) in 1902 (a few months later he changed their surname to Odling-Smee). They had three children before she died of food poisoning in 1911.

 

William Hamilton (c1791-1850s)

 

He was born in Crieff where he became a woollen manufacturer in the 1810s and 1820s and a whisky distiller in the 1830s. He moved with his family to Glasgow in the 1840s perhaps for economic reasons following the likely failure of his whisky business. He had ten children, seven of whom survived to adulthood, two girls and five boys. The older girl, Elizabeth Hamilton (1821-60), died aged 39 in Edinburgh. The younger one, Catherine Hamilton (1830-1918), married John Aitchison (1828-1912), who was a tailor and clothier and later a registrar of births, etc. in Edinburgh. The oldest boy, Peter Hamilton (1823-51), died aged only 27 and was buried in the Southern Necropolis of Glasgow. Three of the other sons, Alexander Hamilton (1826-1901), William Hamilton (1828-91) and Gilbert Brown Hamilton (1832-1916) married and had families although in Alexander’s case the children were his wife’s from an earlier marriage. Alexander and William were both clerks in private businesses in Glasgow. Gilbert Brown, who was named after his uncle the Reverend Gilbert Brown, was an accountant in an engineering company in Edinburgh. John James Hamilton (1834-97) did not marry and lived in Logie, Perthshire. He was a manufacturer of silk goods or dress goods, including fancy dress.

 

Richard Reader Harris (1814-92)

 

He was Chief Constable of Worcester and also a barrister. His son, also Richard Reader Harris, was a civil engineer, barrister, Methodist Minister and author of many books on Christian subjects. His great grandson, also Richard Reader Harris, was a Conservative MP in the 1950s and 1960s.

 

Sarah Frances Harris (1805-42)

 

She was the housekeeper of William Maxfield, a retired East India Navy officer, whom she married shortly before his death. She inherited all his money, some of which she left to her brothers with the bulk going to her sister Emma Walters (nee Harris) and in trust for Emma’s children. William Maxfield’s daughter contested his Will unsuccessfully.

 

David Henderson (1838-93)

 

He was born in Dunfermline where his father was a baker. The family moved to Edinburgh and  David became a copperplate printer. He had eleven children, seven girls and four boys. One died when three months old. All but two of the others married and had children. The oldest daughter Janet Henderson (1859-1952), known as Jenny to the family, and Ellen Henderson (1876-1936), known as Nellie, were the two who did not marry. The girls all worked before they married, either as saleswomen in shops or in clerical jobs. Sophia Henderson (1861-1938), Elizabeth Henderson (1865-1939), Mary Henderson (1869-1962) and Nellie were saleswomen, usually in draper’s shops. Mary worked at Jenners in Princes Street, Edinburgh, where she fitted ladies’ corsets. She married William Hamilton Aitchison (1866-1948), a sailor, and had one child, Katharine Hamilton Aitchison (1903-97). Jenny and Margaret Henderson (1879-1959) were typists. Jenny was one of the first lady stenographers in Edinburgh and was the secretary to the managing director of Bovril. She gave up work in her 40s to keep house for her brother George William Henderson (1875-1957) and help bring up his only child after his wife died. All four of the boys, John Henderson (1863-1918), David G Henderson (1867-1950), Charles Howe Henderson (1872- ?) and George William Henderson (1875-1957) followed their father into the printing trade. They lived in Edinburgh except for Charles Howe who emigrated to Argentina.

 

Archibald Heurtley (died 1822)

 

He was a ship’s captain in the West Indies trade and later an agent for Lloyd’s in Portsmouth. His obituary was in The Gentleman’s Magazine, January 1823. He had two children.

 

Elizabeth Hutchison (1818-79)

 

After her father died in 1833 (her mother had already died), William and Susanna Smee became her guardians. She and her brother William were raised with the Smee children, one of whom, Alfred Smee, she later married. She and Alfred had two children, Alfred Hutchison Smee (1841-1901) and Elizabeth Mary Smee (1843-1919). Alfred Hutchison shared his father's interest in science, the treatment of sewage, insurance, gardening and fishing. Mary, as she was known, was close to her father and wrote a biography of him. She married William Odling (1829-1921) who was a doctor, scientist, and Fellow of the Royal Society.

 

George Hutchison (1764-1833)

 

He was a clerk at the Bank of England from 1787 until he died in office. His older brother William Hutchison (1759-1828) also worked in the Bank where he rose to the position of Deputy Accountant which he held from 1800 to 1828. For a number of years he was therefore the immediate superior of William Smee (1777-1858) who succeeded him as Deputy Accountant. The Hutchison brothers and William Smee knew each other at the Bank from 1801 when William first joined.

 

His first wife Elizabeth Ann Ely (1785-1825) was over 20 years younger than him, yet she died before him leaving him aged 61 with two young children. Although he married again, he arranged for the children to be looked after by William Smee and his wife in the event of his death. Thus William and Susanna Smee became the guardians of Elizabeth Hutchison (1818-1879) and William Hutchison (1822-1863) and raised them with their own children. George and his brother William both left considerable sums of money in trust for Elizabeth and William. Elizabeth later married Alfred Smee (1818-1877), William and Susanna’s second son.

 

William Hutchison (1822-63)

 

After his father died in 1833 (his mother had already died), William and Susanna Smee became his guardians. He and his sister were raised with the Smee children. While a student at Cambridge, he became disenchanted with the Church of England and was received into the Roman Catholic church in 1845. He had an audience with the Pope in 1846 and was ordained a Catholic priest in 1847. He joined the Oratorians, and helped to set up the London Oratory. His main work was helping poor Catholics in London. He contributed much of his considerable inheritance to Catholic causes, including the construction of the Brompton Oratory. Advised by his doctors to go to sunnier climes because of poor health, he visited both Nazareth and Loreto, Italy, and wrote a book about the transportation of Jesus’ house in Nazareth to Loreto by angels.

 

John Key (1793-1858)

 

He was a wholesale stationer and politician in the City of London, being variously Sheriff (1824), Lord Mayor (1830-32) and Chamberlain (1853-58) of the City. He was allowed by William IV to revive an old Baronetcy on the occasion of the opening of London Bridge in 1831. He was Whig MP for the City in 1832-33 but had to resign over a scandal (he accepted a government contract to supply paper to the stationery office and lied about the age of his son). He had five children, the oldest of whom, Kingsmill Grove Key (1815-99) succeeded to the baronetcy. There was an obituary in The Times 16 July 1858.

 

John Kingsmill Causton Key (1853-1926)

 

He was a clergyman who was a missionary with the Universities Mission to Central Africa and canon of Zanzibar cathedral. He inherited the baronetcy when his father died in 1899. As he died without issue, the baronetcy passed to his half brother, Kingsmill James Key (1864-1932), his father’s son by his third wife, after which it lapsed. He officiated at the marriage of his cousin’s daughter, Dorothy Louise Hahn (1893-1976), at St John’s, Notting Hill, in 1917. There was an obituary in The Times 29 April 1926.

 

Kingsmill Grove Key (1815-99)

 

He was an engineer and businessman, and inherited the baronetcy on his father’s death. He married his cousin, Mary Sophia Hahn (1818-55), with whom he had four children. The only boy, John Kingsmill Causton Key (1853-1926), inherited the baronetcy. After Mary Sophia died, he married again three times, and had a son with his third wife Mary Ann Kershaw (1819-1867), who was a widow named Mary Ann Tidman when she married Kingsmill Grove Key.

 

Kingsmill James Key (1864-1932)

 

He played cricket and rugby for Surrey for many years, and was captain of the Surrey cricket team for five years. He inherited the baronetcy when his half brother, John Kingsmill Causton Key (1853-1926), died. He had no sons and was the fourth and last baronet.

 

William Maxfield (1781-1837)

 

From 1803 to 1825 he was in the Bombay Marine, which was the East India Navy until 1832 when it became the Indian Navy. His final rank was Captain. He did survey work in the Red Sea, Abyssinia, Sind, the Malabar Coast and the Bengal Coast, and was First Assistant to the Marine Surveyor General. After returning to England he campaigned for improvements to the Bengal Marine. He was appointed a JP in Middlesex in 1831 and was the MP for Great Grimsby from 1832 to 1834. His only child was a daughter born in India to a mother to whom he was not married. He married his housekeeper, Sarah Harris (1805-42), shortly before he died and left everything to her. (The Will was challenged unsuccessfully by his daughter.) Sarah’s sister, Emma Walters (1810-86), knew William before her marriage when they both lived in Sunbury, Middlesex. William was a witness at her marriage to Charles Walters in 1829, and she gave two of her children, James in 1830 and Helen in 1834, the middle name of Maxfield, suggesting that he was close to the Harris family.

 

Aldo George Odling (1901-61)

 

He was the only son of Frederick Jameson Odling (1867-1942). He was an officer in the Italian navy and had four children, three sons and a daughter.

 

Anselm Odling (1704-66)

 

He was a grazier in Ashby-cum-Fenby, Lincolnshire. He had 13 children the youngest of whom was Charles (1751-1836).

 

Anselm Odling (1790-1870)

 

He was born in Tetney where his father, Charles Odling (1751-1836) was a farmer. He was a draper, first in Nottingham where his partnership with Joseph Green was dissolved in 1816 and subsequently in Lincoln where he had a partnership with Robert Cooke; it too was dissolved, in 1824. He became a respected figure in the city and a councillor for the Lower Ward.

 

He had seven children, four boys and three girls. The oldest boy, Anselm William Odling (1821-1907), became a merchant in the marble trade in London in the 1860s. The second son, Edward Cooke Odling (1823-1900), was a general practitioner and surgeon in Wendover, Buckinghamshire. The third son Charles Odling (1826-1914) was a farmer in Hampshire in 1861 and subsequently an iron founder. The fourth son, Robert Cooke Odling (1828-86) succeeded his father as a draper in Lincoln. Two of the three girls married. Anselm Odling had at least 17 grandchildren.

 

Anselm Odling (1821-1907)

 

He was born in Lincoln and started his career as a draper in Louth, Lincolnshire, where he lived in the 1850s. He moved to Lincoln where, as a draper, he had a partnership with his brother, Robert Cooke Odling (1828-86), until it was dissolved in 1861. In the same year he described himself in the census as a manufacturing chemist. He might have been associated then with The Patent Oil and Stearine Company Limited, of which he became chairman many years later. He started a marble business in London in the 1860s and this occupied him for the rest of his life. When his sons grew up he formed a company called Anselm Odling and Sons Limited in 1892. His wife and children were among the directors. The company continued to operate in the marble business until 1968. He was living in South London (Brixton and Kennington) in the 1860s when his sons were born and in Brighton in the 1870s. From the 1880s he lived in Croydon.

 

He lost his first wife when their two daughters were only one and two years old and they were still living in Louth. He married again three years later and had four sons who were born in South London. The sons, William Anselm Odling (1864-1950), Herbert Charles Odling (1865-1937), George Alfred Odling (1866-1932) and Frederick Jameson Odling (1867-1942) all worked in the family marble company. The three oldest ones managed the Australian business at different times, with William Anselm, the last to do so, spending the rest of his life there after he arrived in about 1912. Herbert Charles became chairman after their father died in 1907. George Alfred was managing director of the company; he died in Carrara, Italy, in 1932. Frederick Jameson lived in Carrara from about 1890.

 

Arthur Odling (1847-1937)

 

He was a tea planter in India for 30 years or more from the early 1860s to the 1890s. He served his apprenticeship at Badamtan Tea Estate in the Darjeeling district and then moved to Assam where he set up his own estate in the Cachar District. With two others he formed the A.M.O. Tea Company, the O standing for Odling. After returning to the UK he settled in Hampstead. He was a director of The East India and Ceylon Tea Company (Limited) from 1903 and of The Lungla (Sylhet) Tea Company Limited in 1920. He left £138157 in his will (net personalty £138071) of which £100 was to go to the Indian Tea Planters Benevolent Fund (The Times 14 April 1937).

 

He married late and had five children, all born in Hampstead. One daughter died young. The oldest son, Francis Crawford Odling (1893-1988), was a doctor. The second son, Arthur Norman Odling (1895-1975), lived and worked in India like his father. The third son, Harold Robert Odling (1897-1975), was a chartered accountant in the UK. The only surviving daughter, Kathleen Beryl Odling (1901-95), married Robert Annesley Godwin-Austen, a nephew of the man after whom Mount Godwin-Austen (K2) was named. Arthur had twelve grandchildren.

 

Arthur Norman Odling (1895-1975)

 

He was the second son of Arthur Odling (1847-1937). He went to Sandhurst before World War I and was commissioned into the 4th Dragoon Guards. He lost a leg during the war. After the war he was in business in Calcutta and then moved to Kalimpong, Bengal, where his wife Bunty Graham's father had founded in 1900 what became known as Dr Graham's Homes. Together with Bunty, he managed the production and sale of traditional handicrafts. They ran the Kalimpong Missionary Industries Association Ltd and Norman was Director of Kalimpong Arts and Crafts. He was also a wool broker and carried out trade in wool between Tibet, India and America. He was awarded the OBE  in the New Year Honours 1946 for his work in recruiting labour for the Ledo Road, the production of seaboot stockings from Tibetan wool and other activities in the war against Japan. He retired to the UK after World War II and was active in local affairs in Gloucestershire.

 

He had three daughters. They were all born and grew up in India but settled in the UK.

 

Charles Odling (1751-1836)

 

He was born in Ashby-cum-Fenby, Lincolnshire. He farmed in the nearby village of Tetney until the 1800s or 1810s when he moved to Buslingthorpe about 20 miles away where he built Manor Farm on land that had probably been the site of Buslingthorpe Manor which burnt down in about 1800. He set up his oldest son Thomas as a tenant farmer. His son William inherited the tenancy of Manor Farm.

 

He had 13 children, 12 of whom survived to adulthood. Only two were girls, neither of whom married. Five of the sons, Thomas, Charles, John, Christopher and William, were farmers and remained in Tetney (Charles and Christopher) or Buslingthorpe (Thomas, John and William) the rest of their lives. Four of the sons, Edward, George, Joseph and Francis moved to London where they worked as apothecaries. Later three of them became doctors and one, Edward, a milliner. The other surviving son, Anselm, was a draper in Lincoln. The older daughter, Hannah Maria, lived with her brothers Charles and Christopher on their farm in Tetney. The other daughter, Harriet, lived in London. Only six of Charles’s children had children themselves, giving Charles 41 grandchildren.

 

Charles Odling (1789-1865)

 

He was born in Tetney, the third child of Charles Odling (1751-1836). He inherited the tenancy of his father’s 250 acre farm in Tetney where he had two or three labourers. His sister Hannah Maria (1786-1871) and brother Christopher (1794-1871), neither of whom married, lived with him. He was married without children. After he died his widow Jane Odling (nee Marshall) (1813-96) inherited the tenancy of the farm. Her sisters came to live with her.

 

Charles Odling (1826-1914)

 

He was the fifth child and third son of Anselm Odling (1790-1870). He was a farmer in Hampshire in 1861 and an iron founder in the 1870s. According to family lore, he was not successful. His first wife had money which he helped her spend but she managed to leave some of it to their only daughter Florenza Ross Odling (1858-89). Florenza was given her name because she was born in Florence. He remarried in 1873 after his first wife died and had two more children.

 

Charles William Odling (1847-1932)

 

He was the first child of William Odling (1799-1874). He was an engineer in the Indian government Public Works Department from 1865 to 1902 and served in Bengal and United Provinces. He became a CSI (Companion of the Order of the Star of India) in January 1898 for organising large scale public works to provide people with the means of subsistence during the severe famine of 1896-97 in United Provinces. He published a monograph in 1896 on waterways and irrigation in India. He was a member of the Provincial Legislature in United Provinces. He was a Fellow of the Universities of Calcutta and Allahabad. (Obituary in The Times, 22 July, 1932. Entries in Dictionary of Indian Biography, 1906, and Who Was Who in British India, 1998.)

 

He married Alice Romayne Mary Meade in 1891 in India. They had two children, a girl and a boy, who were born in Darjeeling. The son, Eric Robert Meade Odling (1893-1915) was killed in World War I.

 

Christopher Odling (1794-1871)

 

He was born in Tetney, the seventh child of Charles Odling (1751-1836). Unmarried, he lived with his brother Charles Odling (1789-1865) and sister Hannah Maria Odling (1786-1871) on Charles’ farm in Tetney.

 

Douglas Odling (1893-1938)

 

He was the oldest son of Tom Francis Odling (1851-1906) and his second wife Jean. He was educated at Dover College amd studied medicine at Edinburgh University but did not complete his studies. He worked in many places, including the City, South Africa (in the Mounted Police), Belgian Congo (mining) and Northern Rhodesia (mining). He was killed on a visit to Johannesburg when someone threw a stone that hit him.

 

Edward Odling (1793-1860)

 

He was born in Tetney, the sixth child of Charles Odling (1751-1836). He moved to London in the 1810s or 1820s and joined the medical business that his brother George (1795-1872) started and which included two other brothers Francis (1801-82) and Joseph (1796-1876). The four of them formed a partnership in the early 1820s known as Messrs. Odlings. The partnership was dissolved in 1828 and Edward and Francis had their own medical business (“Chymists, Surgeon, etc.”) at 26 Oxford Street during the 1830s. This partnership in turn was dissolved in 1838 and Edward moved onto other things. He was not qualified as either a surgeon or an apothecary unlike the other three brothers who were both. In 1851 Edward and his wife, Maria (nee Povey, 1817-85), were both working as milliners.

 

He had three sons. The oldest, Walter Odling (1852-1942), was a chemist who worked in the brewing industry. The two younger sons, Marcus Odling (1854-82) and Harry Montague Odling (1858-85) moved to Australia where they died in their 20s. Their mother also moved to Australia and died just nine days after her youngest son.

 

Edward Odling (1823-1896)

 

He was the fifth child and second son of Thomas Odling (1788-1863). As the oldest surviving son, he inherited the tenancy of his father's farm, East Farm in Buslingthorpe, in 1863. He had previously been farming in Gringley, Nottinghamshire. He had only one child, Charles Edward Odling (1861-1948), to whom the tenancy passed on his death. The farm remained in the family until the 1930s.

 

Edward Cooke Odling (1823-1900)

 

He was the fourth child and second son of Anselm Odling (1790-1870). He qualified as a Licentiate of the Society of Apothecaries in 1845 and became a member of the Royal College of Surgeons of England in the same year. He practiced as a doctor first in Alford, Lincolnshire, and then in Wendover, Buckinghamshire.

 

He had five children, two of whom died in childhood. The oldest, Lucy Jane Odling (1850-81), married her first cousin once removed, Tom Francis Odling (1851-1906). She went with him to Persia where she died aged only 31. The second to survive to adulthood, Alfred Edward Odling (1857-1902), followed his father and became a doctor. The third surviving child, Henry Hammond Odling (1861-1921) was a teacher.

 

Egbert Francis Odling (1881-1957)

 

He was the only child of Tom Francis and Lucy Jane Odling who survived to adulthood. He was educated at Winchester and Trinity College Cambridge. He became a priest in the Church of England and served in parishes in Yorkshire and Gateshead. He wrote The Pastor and his Guide. Although he was engaged in 1918 to Gladys Victoria Woolerton, daughter of Dr and Mrs Woolerton of Wendover, it seems that he never married. He retired to Felixstowe.

 

Emma Louisa Odling (1840-1908)

 

She was the oldest child of Francis Odling (1801-82). She married Thomas Henry Rowney who was a professor of chemistry in Galway. She was his second wife; his first wife, who died, was her first cousin, Harriet Odling.

 

Florenza Ross Odling (1858-89)

 

Florenza was given her name because she was born in Florence. She was educated at St Mary's Abbey, the Benedictine Convent at East Bergholt, Suffolk. Her husband, Joseph Odling (1849-1912), was her first cousin once removed. She had previously been engaged to Walter Odling, another first cousin once removed. She had four children. One of her two sons died young and the other, Frank Sadler Odling (1886-1917) was killed in World War I.

 

Francis Odling (1801-82)

 

He was born in Tetney, the youngest child and eleventh son of Charles Odling (1751-1836). He moved to London and became apprenticed to his brother George Odling in 1819 who himself had only become a licenced apothecary earlier in the year. After five years he qualified as a Licentiate of the Society of Apothecaries in 1825. He studied medicine at Guy’s Hospital and in 1826 became a Member of the Royal College of Surgeons of England (MRCSE). He joined the medical business that George started and which included two other brothers Edward and Joseph. The four of them formed a partnership in the early 1820s known as Messrs. Odlings. Their first shops were in High Street, Borough, and Union Street, Southwark, but by 1828 they had another shop at 26 Oxford Street. The partnership between the four brothers was split in 1828 into two partnerships, one of Edward and Francis at 26 Oxford Street, and the other of the other two brothers at 159 High Street, Southwark (George), and 171 Union Street, Southwark (Joseph). Edward and Francis were described as "Chymists, Surgeon, etc.". The partnership between Edward Odling "Chymist" and Francis Odling "Surgeon" was dissolved in 1838. He continued in general practice at 26 Oxford Street and, from the mid-1840s, Devonshire Street which was round the corner from Harley Street. After retiring in the 1870s he moved to Adelaide Road.

 

He had seven children, six of whom survived to adulthood. In addition, he had three children who lived only one day: Elizabeth (1835), Eliza (1836) and Albert (1850). Three of the surviving children were boys and three were girls. The oldest son, Francis James Odling (1845-1906), was an engineer who worked in Derby before emigrating to Australia and working in mining and metallurgy. The second son, Arthur Odling (1847-1937), was a tea planter in Assam. The third son, Percy Leigh Odling (1858-1937), also emigrated to Australia. The three daughters all married, Emma Louisa Odling (1840-1908) to a professor of chemistry in Galway, Lucy Frances Odling (1843-1931) to a businessman in London, and Ellen Odling (1848-1917) to a doctor in Sheffield. Francis had 18 grandchildren.

 

Frank Sadler Odling (1886-1917)

 

He was the only son of Joseph Odling (1849-1912) who survived to adulthood. He took over Manor Farm, Buslingthorpe, from his father but was unsuccessful and had to give it up after three years. It had been farmed by the family for about a hundred years. He was a magnificent horseman but had an alcohol problem. He was killed in action at Passchendaele in Flanders.

 

Frederick Jameson Odling (1867-1942)

 

He was educated at Brighton College. He moved to Carrara, Italy, in about 1892 to work in the Italian end of the family marble business, Anselm Odling and Sons Limited, of which he was a director. He later sold his share in the company to his brothers Herbert and George.

 

He married an Italian and they lived in Italy and London at different times. They had two children, a daughter Nella Susan Odling and a son Aldo George Odling. Nella married twice, first to an Englishman in London and subsequently to a Peruvian with whom she lived in Lima. Aldo George was an officer in the Italian navy and had four children.

 

George Odling (1795-1872)

 

He was born in Tetney, the eighth child of Charles Odling (1751-1836). He was apprenticed as an apothecary in Louth and received his Licentiate of the Society of Apothecaries in 1819. In the same year he started a pharmacy business in Southwark and took on two of his brothers, Joseph and Francis, as apprentices. He studied medicine at the Borough Hospitals and became a Member of the Royal College of Surgeons of England in 1821.  He formed a partnership with Joseph, Francis and another brother, Edward, in the early 1820s known as Messrs. Odlings. Their first pharmacies were in High Street, Borough, and Union Street, Southwark, but by 1828 they had another shop at 26 Oxford Street. The partnership between the four brothers was split in 1828 into two partnerships, one of Edward and Francis at 26 Oxford Street, and the other of the other two brothers at 159 High Street, Southwark (George), and 171 Union Street, Southwark (Joseph). The partnership between Joseph and George was dissolved in 1829, only six months later. In 1828 Joseph and George were described as "Chymists, Surgeons, etc" and in 1829 as Surgeons only.

 

He was in general practice in Southwark from the 1820s to the 1850s. He was for a time the parochial surgeon which involved responsibilities for the health of poor people. He was medical officer to the St Saviour's Union (ie workhouse doctor). He was also surgeon to the M Division of the Metropolitan Police which covered Southwark. He was often a witness in coroner's inquests and criminal trials which were reported in the newspapers, including The Times. In the 1830s he was one of the surgeons to The Licensed Victuallers' and General Fire and Life Assurance Company. For 30 years he was the medical officer for the Licensed Victuallers' School in Kennington.

 

He had two children, a boy and a girl. His son, William Odling (1829-1921), trained as a doctor but worked primarily as a chemist. He was a FRS, Fullerian Professor of Chemistry at the Royal Institution and Waynflete Professor of Chemistry at Oxford. His daughter, Mary Ann Odling (1831-1927), married George Bowdler Buckton (1818-1905), a FRS, chemist and entomologist. He had 11 grandchildren.

 

George Alfred Odling (1866-1932)

 

He was educated at Brighton College. He worked in the family marble business, Anselm Odling and Sons Limited, of which he became managing director. In the 1900s he lived in Sydney where he ran the Australian end of the business. After that he lived mostly in Carrara where he died.

 

He was unmarried and left his property to his nephews and nieces.

 

George Smee Odling (1873-1926)

 

He was the oldest child of William Odling (1829-1921). He studied physics at Magdalen College Oxford and was articled to a firm of water and sewage engineers, eventually qualifying as a civil engineer. He changed his name to Odling-Smee in October 1902 following the death in 1901 of his uncle, Alfred Hutchison Smee, who favoured him in his will if he adopted the name Smee. He inherited his uncle's house, The Grange, Wallington, and was active in local affairs in Wallington and Croydon, becoming JP in 1905. He moved to Guildford in about 1906 and trained to be a barrister. He was again active in local affairs being on Guildford Town Council (Mayor in 1913-16), Surrey County Council, and the boards of hospitals, among other things.

 

He married twice and had three children with his first wife Emma Mary Hahn (1872-1911). After she died suddenly of a food-borne illness when the children were all under seven years old, he married again. He did not have any more children. His oldest son, Charles William Odling-Smee (1904-90) was a civil engineer and priest. The second son, Alfred John Odling-Smee (1906-87), was an officer in the Royal Sussex Regiment and fought in World War II. The youngest child, Barbara Odling-Smee (1910-88), married an army officer who was also in the Royal Sussex Regiment.

 

Hannah Maria Odling (1786-1871)

 

She was born in Tetley, the oldest of Charles Odling’s (1751-1836) 13 children. Unmarried, she lived with her brothers Charles (1789-1865) and Christopher (1794-1871) in Tetney where they farmed 250 acres. After Charles died, she was living in Lincoln in 1871 with Lucy Odling, the widow of her brother Anselm Odling (1790-1870).

 

Harold Robert Odling (1897-1975)

 

He was the third son of Arthur Odling (1847-1947). He served in World War I when he lost a leg. He qualified as a chartered accountant and became assistant chief accountant at Unilever. He had four sons.

 

Harriet Odling (1797-1864)

 

She was born in Tetney, the tenth child and only the second (and last) daughter of Charles Odling (1751-1836). Unmarried, she went to London where she lived in Kensington.

 

Herbert Charles Odling (1865-1937)

 

He was educated at Brighton College. He worked in the family marble business, Anselm Odling and Sons Limited, of which he became chairman after his father's death in 1907. In the 1890s he lived in Sydney where he ran the Australian end of the business and then moved back to England. He had a miniature farm including Jersey and Kerry cows and prize poultry.

 

He had one son who worked in the family marble business and two daughters. He and his wife took in the orphaned children of his cousin Tom Francis Odling who had died in 1906 after their mother died in 1908.

 

John Odling (1791-1864)

 

He was born in Tetney, the fifth child of Charles Odling (1751-1836). Unmarried, in his later years he lived with his brother William (1799-1874) at the family farm in Buslingthorpe.

 

Joseph Odling (1796-1876)

 

He was born in Tetney, the ninth child of Charles Odling (1751-1836). He moved to London and became apprenticed to his brother George Odling in 1819 who himself had only become a licenced apothecary earlier in the year. After five years he qualified as a Licentiate of the Society of Apothecaries in 1825. He became a Member of the Royal College of Surgeons of England (MRCSE) in 1831. He joined the medical business that George started and which included two other brothers Edward and Francis. The four of them formed a partnership in the early 1820s known as Messrs. Odlings. Their first shops were in High Street, Borough, and Union Street, Southwark, but by 1828 they had another shop at 26 Oxford Street. The partnership between the four brothers was split in 1828 into two partnerships, one of Edward and Francis at 26 Oxford Street, and the other of the other two brothers at 159 High Street, Southwark (George), and 171 Union Street, Southwark (Joseph). The partnership between Joseph and George was dissolved in 1829, only six months later. In 1828 Joseph and George were described as "Chymists, Surgeons, etc" and in 1829 as Surgeons only. Joseph continued to describe himself as a surgeon in later years. He moved to Barnes in the 1840s and lived there the rest of his life. He married twice but had no children.

 

Joseph Odling (1849-1912)

 

He was the third child and second son of William Odling (1799-1874). He took over the tenancy of Manor Farm, Buslingthorpe, from his father in 1874. It comprised about 400 acres and in 1881 there were seven men and two boys working on it. He died suddenly: he came in from work, talked to his wife, went to bed and died.

 

He married his first cousin once removed, Florenza Ross Odling (1858-89), and they had four children, two girls and two boys. One of the boys died young and the other was Frank Sadler Odling (1886-1917) who took over the farm after Joseph died. After his wife died, his sister Anne Odling (1848-1931) lived with him for a time. He remarried in 1899.

 

Lucy Frances Odling (1843-1931)

 

She was the second child and daughter of Francis Odling (1801-82) who survived to adulthood. She married a paper manufacturer, Edward Elliot Jackson, and had four children. The youngest, John Ernest Jackson (1876-1941) worked in the Indian railways for over 30 years. He headed the Bombay, Baroda and Central India Railway from 1925 to 1932 and was knighted in 1924.

 

Marmaduke Odling (1886-1955)

 

He was the third son of William Odling (1829-1921). He was educated at Radley College and Magdalen College, Oxford. He was a scientist and lectured in geology at Leeds University in 1911-17. He was a chemical and technical adviser to The Tees Furnace Co at Lackenby Iron Works in1921. He started a company for using slag as a road material and for concrete. He built his own house and garden in Marton-in-Cleveland. He married but had no children.

 

Nella Susan Odling (1899-  )

 

She was the only daughter of Frederick Jameson Odling (1867-1942). She married twice, first in 1919 in London to an Englishman with whom she lived in Carrara and England. She went with him to Peru where she met Carlos Chocano, a Peruvian. She left her first husband, who returned to England, and had three children with Carlos, two of whom subsequently emigrated to the United States. She obtained a divorce from her first husband in 1934.

 

Thomas Odling (1788-1863)

 

He was born in Tetley, the second of Charles Odling’s (1751-1836) 13 children and the oldest son. His father set him up as a tenant farmer in Buslingthorpe; the farm had about 300 acres in 1851. The tenancy passed to his oldest surviving son, Edward (1823-96), and subsequently to his son, Charles Edward Odling (1861-1948). It remained in the family thereafter.

 

During much of the 19th century there were two Odling families farming in Buslingthorpe, those of the brothers Thomas (1788-1863) and William (1799-1874). The village was small, with a population of only 55 in 1831 rising to 82 in 1891. According to family lore, Thomas was not on speaking terms with William and his family. However, this might be an exaggeration because Thomas’ son, also Thomas Odling (1828-1901), lived and worked with William at Manor Farm for many years as a young man.

 

Thomas had twelve children with his first wife and one, who died aged 9, with his second wife. Three of the five who survived into adulthood engaged in farming except for Thomas who was a coal merchant in Skegness and Christopher who worked as a chemist in London. Edward took over the family farm, and William Ireland Odling (known as William Hiram Odling in his younger days) was recorded as dumb in the censuses of 1871 and 1881. Four of the six girls married farmers or agricultural labourers. One, Anne, married a grocer and druggist. One of the girls, Judith, had a natural child, Jane, when in her early 20s. The child grew up in her grandfather’s house even after Judith married some years later. Most of Thomas’ children lived in Buslingthorpe or nearby except for Anne who moved to Nottingham, Christopher who went to London, Thomas who lived in Skegness and Lucy who lived near York until her husband died when she moved back to Lincolnshire.

 

Thomas Odling (1828-1901)

 

He was the tenth child of Thomas Odling (1788-1863). He lived and worked on his uncle William's farm in Buslingthorpe as a young man. He moved to Skegness where he worked as a coal merchant and later an accountant and tax collector. He had two sons and two daughters. One son died aged four, and his wife died the same year. He did not remarry.

 

Tom Francis Odling (1851-1906)

 

He was the fourth child and third son of William Odling (1799-1874). He trained in medicine at St Bartholomew's Hospital and was admitted as a Member of the Royal College of Surgeons of England in May 1872. He joined the Indo-European Telegraph Establishment in Persia in 1873 as a medical assistant. He was stationed in Ispahan in 1875. He was with HM Telegraph Service in Shiraz from the late 1870s until at least 1887. From 1891 he was the Surgeon to the British Legation in Teheran where he died in 1906 of enteric fever during a cholera outbreak. He became a CMG in 1891.

 

His first wife was his first cousin once removed, Lucy Jane Odling (1850-81). They had three children, two of whom died in Shiraz before the age of 3. His wife also died in Shiraz when she was only 31. He remarried a few years later and had another five children.

 

Tom Murdoch Odling (1895-1981)

 

He was the second son of Tom Francis Odling (1851-1906) and his second wife Jean. He was educated at Christ's Hospital Blue Coat School. He subsequently lived in India. He was a lieutenant in the Indian Army Cavalry Reserve (Madras) but saw no service in World War I. After the war he was a tea planter at Durrang Tea Estate, Bindahume, in Assam. He returned from India to the UK in 1951.

 

Walter Odling (1852-1942)

 

He was educated at the City of London School and the Royal College of Chemistry and School of Mines. He was elected a Fellow of the Chemical Society in 1873. He was appointed brewer and chemist for Messrs Bass and Co in Burton upon Trent in 1874 and later became head brewer. He retired in 1922 after nearly 50 years with the company. His obituary was published in the Journal of the Royal Chemical Society, 1943.

 

He was engaged to Florenza Ross Odling, his first cousin once removed, and converted to Roman Catholicism because she was RC. But they did not marry. He had four daughters with his first wife and none with his second. Two of his daughters married brewers.

 

William Odling (1799-1874)

 

He was born in Tetney, the eleventh child and ninth son of Charles Odling (1751-1836). He moved with his father to Buslingthorpe and, although he was one of the youngest sons, he took over the tenancy of his father’s farm, Manor Farm. It comprised about 400 acres and at one time there were eight agricultural labourers working on it. The farm passed to his son Joseph (1849-1912) and then to his son Frank Sadler Odling (1886-1917) who gave up the tenancy in 1915.

 

During much of the 19th century there were two Odling families farming in Buslingthorpe, those of the brothers Thomas (1788-1863) and William (1799-1874). The village was small, with a population of only 55 in 1831 rising to 82 in 1891. According to family lore, Thomas was not on speaking terms with William and his family. However, this might be an exaggeration because Thomas’ son, also Thomas Odling (1828-1901), lived and worked with William at Manor Farm for many years as a young man.

 

William had eight children, three boys and five girls. Two of the boys pursued successful careers abroad, Charles William (1847-1932) as an engineer in India and Tom Francis (1851-1906) as a doctor in Persia. The other boy, Joseph (1849-1912) stayed in Buslingthorpe and took over the family farm from his father. One of the girls also ended up abroad: Kate Mary (b.1854) married a farmer who moved to Canada around the turn of the century. Two of the girls, Anne and Alice Holland, did not marry and spent their later years living together in Lincoln. The other two, Fanny and Jane Elizabeth, both died in 1871 when they were teenagers.  William had 24 grandchildren.

 

William Odling (1829-1921)

 

He was the only son of George Odling (1795-1872). He studied medicine at Guy's Hospital and became MB and FRCP but did not practice medicine. He was the medical officer of health for Lambeth parish from 1857 or earlier until 1862 where he was especially concerned with the quality of drinking water and the treatment of sewage. His main interest was chemistry which he studied in Paris. He taught chemistry at Guy's in the 1850s (he was director of the chemical laboratory there from 1850), St Bart's Hospital from 1863, as Fullerian Professor of Chemistry at the Royal Institution, in succession to Faraday, from 1868 to 1873, and as Waynflete Professor of Chemistry at Oxford from 1872 to 1912. He was often an expert witness in legal cases involving chemicals. He published many books and papers on chemistry and was active in the Chemical Society and the Institute of Chemistry, being president of both at different times. He became FRS in 1859.

 

He married Elizabeth Mary Smee (1843-1919), the only daughter of Alfred Smee (1818-77) who was also a scientist who had studied medicine. They had four children. The only girl died aged 12 of epilepsy and pleurisy. The oldest son, George Smee Odling (1873-1926), who changed his name to Odling-Smee in 1902, was an engineer and justice of the peace and was active in local government. The second son, William Alfred Odling (1879-1943), was an army officer and fought in the Boer War and World War I. The third son, Marmaduke Odling (1886-1955), was a scientist who taught at Leeds University and later worked in industry. William had five grandchildren and fourteen great grandchildren.

 

William Alfred Odling (1879-1943)

 

He was the second son of William Odling (1829-1921). He studied at Worcester College, Oxford, and had intended to become a doctor. But the Boer War created an opportunity to become an army officer and he joined the Duke of Cambridge's Own (Middlesex Regiment) and went to South Africa. Later he was posted to the Legation Guard in Peking and to Guernsey and fought in World War I. He retired from the army after the war and bought a farm in Gloucestershire.

 

His wife, Mary Bennett Case (1880-1963), was, like himself, the child of an Oxford professor. They had two sons, William Odling (1909-97) who was an army officer who became Major-General CB, OBE, MC, and Thomas George Odling (1911-2002) who was a Clerk in the House of Commons.

 

William Anselm Odling (1864-1950)

 

He was educated at Brighton College. He worked in the family marble business, Anselm Odling and Sons Limited, of which he was a director. From about 1912 he lived in Sydney where he ran the Australian end of the business.

 

He had one son who was an architect in Sydney.

 

Joseph Ray (c1625-1707)

 

He was a woollen draper.

 

Samuel Ray (1656-1738)

 

He was a grocer in Worlingworth, Suffolk.

 

William Ray (c1676-1750)

 

He was the vicar of Monk Soham and the godfather of Jeremy Bentham.

 

William Ray (1705-68)

 

He was a grocer and draper in Worlingworth, Suffolk. He owned considerable property in Norfolk and Suffolk, including the rectory at Stow Bedon which he left to his son Charles who was training to take holy orders. He was an elector, and died in lodgings in the Market Place in Norwich where he had gone to vote in county elections.

 

William Ray (1735-90)

 

He was a shopkeeper in Worlingworth, Suffolk. He owned property in Worlingworth, and also in Jamaica. He was found dead, sitting in an upright position, in a hackney coach near Blackfriars Bridge in London.

 

William Ray (1761-1819)

 

He owned farms and other property in Tannington and Worlingworth, Suffolk. His daughter, Susannah (1790-1849), married William Smee (1777-1858) who became the Chief Accountant of the Bank of England.

 

John Christian Schreiber (1737-1807)

 

He was born in Leipzig but spent most of his life in London. He married Louisa Hahn (1729-1816) who was the sister of Frederick Hahn (1728-1806). John and Frederick were part of the German business community in London, and they were both buried in the German Lutheran Chapel in the Savoy. John and Louisa had no children, and John left a good part of his considerable wealth to Frederick’s children, especially his daughter Louisa Daniell (neé Hahn) and her children. John’s sister and her children in Leipzig engaged in a legal dispute with Frederick Hahn’s children over aspects of John’s inheritance. Frederick’s son George Henry Hahn (1770-1846) married Mary Sophia Green (1787-1870) whose father, Francis Green (1748-1815), was a neighbour of John Christian Schreiber’s in Denmark Hill.

 

There was another John Christian Schreiber in London at the same time. He was born in about 1742 and was buried on 1 May 1818 at St George the Martyr, Southwark, where he was living. As a widower, he married Elizabeth Clay on 20 January 1793 at St Bride’s Fleet Street, and later that year she gave birth to their twin daughters who were baptized at St Ann Blackfriars on 22 November.

 

Gregory Seale (1738-1823)

 

He had a bakery in Shadwell and may have been in partnership with Thomas Walters (1756-1825) who was married to his wife’s niece, the former Anna Thompson. Thomas named his son, Gregory Seale Walters, after his partner, and also gave his daughter, Jane Seale Walters, the same middle name.

 

Alfred Smee (1818-1877)

 

Alfred Smee was the second son of William Smee, who became Chief Accountant of the Bank of England, and his wife Susanna. He trained as a doctor and became a member of the Royal College of Surgeons of England in 1840 and a Fellow in 1855. He had broad interests, especially in science and nature, and great energy, and was active in many different fields.

 

He set himself up in 1840 as a consulting surgeon in his house at 7 Finsbury Circus in the City of London. His first formal medical job in 1841 was as surgeon to the Bank of England, a new position for which he was recommended by Sir Astley Cooper, an eminent surgeon, who thought that the Bank could benefit from his skills. He remained at the Bank for the rest of his life. He was a surgeon at the Aldersgate General Dispensary and the Central London Ophthalmic Institution. He was also surgeon (medical referee) to a number of insurance companies.

 

His interest in science was revealed early on. While still a student, he conducted many experiments in chemistry and electricity in his father’s official residence in the Bank of England. In the final years of his medical studies, he was working on his design for a battery and his method of electroplating, both of which were to make him famous. He used the battery for experiments in electroplating which he described in his important book Elements of Electro-Metallurgy, published in December 1840. His work on the battery and electroplating led to his being elected a Fellow of the Royal Society on in 1841, eight days short of his 23rd birthday.

 

For the Bank of England he developed an ink that, unlike other inks, did not fade over time, and he invented a new method of printing bank notes. The ink was used until the 1970s. He drew on his electroplating knowledge to propose that the plates for printing notes should be made by an electrolytic process that reproduced the design from a single master thus ensuring that all notes were identical, which had not been the case before.

 

Electricity and biology were Alfred’s two central scientific interests throughout his life. He was fascinated by how the brain works and had ambitious theories about the electrical workings of the body and mind. Although they did not catch on among mainstream scientists at the time, some of his insights into the brain were echoed a century later in computational science.

 

Although his medical practice, Bank of England responsibilities and scientific work took up much of his time, as he grew into middle age he became increasingly occupied with business activities and public affairs. He was a director of various insurance companies, public utilities (water and railway companies) and hotels. In some cases he was elevated to the chairmanship. He was a supporter of more science education, and campaigned for better water and sewage treatment. He stood three times for Parliament as the Conservative candidate for Rochester, but without success.

 

His main passion was horticulture. He created a garden of eight acres in Wallington, Surrey, where he went every Saturday from his home in Finsbury Circus. He planned all the plantings and collected plants from a great variety of sources. Everything in the garden was described at length in his book My Garden.

 

He married Elizabeth Hutchison (1818-79), who was an orphan. As a teenager she came into the Smee family with her younger brother William (1822-63) when Alfred’s parents became their guardians. Alfred and Elizabeth were engaged when they were both 17 and married just before their 21st birthdays. They had two children, Alfred Hutchison Smee (1841-1901) and Elizabeth Mary Smee (1843-1919). Alfred Hutchison qualified as a doctor but did not practice. He shared his father’s interests in science, the treatment of sewage, insurance, gardening and fishing. Mary, as she was known, was close to her father and wrote a biography of him. She married William Odling (1829-1921) who was, like her father, a doctor, scientist and Fellow of the Royal Society. He was appointed professor of chemistry at Oxford about the time they married, and they lived the rest of their lives in Oxford.

 

Alfred Hutchison Smee (1841-1901)

 

Alfred Hutchison Smee was the oldest child and only son of Alfred and Elizabeth Smee. He trained but did not practice as a doctor. He shared his father’s interests in medicine, science, the treatment of sewage, insurance, gardening and fishing, and contributed in all these areas. He was a Fellow of the Chemical Society, the Statistical Society, the Pathological Society of London and the Epidemiological Society. As Chief Medical Adviser to the Gresham Life Assurance Society, he published many detailed mortality tables and wrote about their implications. He was elected to the Board of the Gresham and became deputy chairman in the 1890s. He was also medical officer of the Accident Insurance Company, the Colonial Assurance Corporation and the Protector Endowment, Loan and Annuity Company. He inherited the garden in Wallington his father had created and he himself helped to develop. He added various features to it, including a fern house of novel construction. He was an enthusiastic grower of orchids and produced new varieties of cattleya and other orchids. Around the time of the death of his father in 1877, he built a large house at the edge of the garden, The Grange, Wallington, where he lived for the rest of his life. He was active in local affairs, with a special interest in water and sanitary matters. He was a member of Surrey County Council, a Justice of the Peace for Surrey, a Conservator of Mitcham Commons and a member of the local Oddfellow, Good Shepherds and Forester Lodges.

 

He married Jane Taylor, a nurse at St Bartholomew’s Hospital. He was concerned that the Smee name should live on in his family even though he had no children. He therefore left his house, its contents and grounds to his sister’s son, George, on condition that he changed his name to Smee or Odling-Smee. (His sister, Elizabeth Mary Smee, had married William Odling, and their first son was called George Smee Odling.) George therefore became George Smee Odling-Smee in 1902, a year after Alfred Hutchison died.

 

Elizabeth Arnold Smee (1803-1871)

 

She was the second child of Joseph Smee (b.1779). After her older brother William Randolph Smee (1801-1870) emigrated to Australia, she kept in touch with him in letters some of which have been deposited in the Society of Australian Genealogists (SAG) and with her younger brother George Raincock Smee (b.1807) who went to Tobago.

 

She married Harvey Dickinson; they had no children. He was a civil servant at the East India Company headquarters (East India House) in London.  Many members of his family also worked for the East India Company. His father, Henry Dickinson, was a civil servant in London and his oldest brother, also Henry Dickinson, spent over 40 years in India, ending up as a judge and member of a regional council. Two of his nephews, Harvey George Dickinson and William Moore Dickinson, had military careers in India, the latter ending up as Major General.

 

Elizabeth Hardy Smee (1793-1859)

 

She was the second child of Joseph Smee (1756-1816) by his second wife Margaret Hobman (1767-1806). Together with her sister Emma, she ran Clifton House, a boarding school for girls in Cheltenham. She died there in 1859. Her tombstone at St Peter's Leckhampton, Cheltenham, reads: "In vain this monumental stone we raise, angels alone can give an angel praise". She did not marry.

 

Elizabeth Mary Smee (1843-1919)

 

She was the second child and only daughter of Alfred and Elizabeth Smee. She was close to her father and shared some of his scientific and other interests. She wrote the chapter on other gardens in his book about his garden, prepared the index and contributed material on the history of the garden. Her father introduced her future husband to her. William Odling was, like Alfred, a doctor, scientist and Fellow of the Royal Society. After she married and moved to Oxford, she kept up a frequent correspondence with her father. After his death, she honoured him by publishing a memoir which included many of his papers and letters.

 

She had four children. The only girl died aged 12 of epilepsy and pleurisy. The oldest son, George Smee Odling (1873-1926), who changed his name to Odling-Smee in 1902, was an engineer and justice of the peace and was active in local government. The second son, William Alfred Odling (1879-1943), was an army officer and fought in the Boer War and World War I. The third son, Marmaduke Odling (1886-1955), was a scientist who taught at Leeds University and later worked in industry.

 

Emma Smee (1803-85)

 

Together with her sister Elizabeth, she ran Clifton House, a boarding school for girls in Cheltenham. She was there in 1851, and left after Elizabeth died in 1859.  Elizabeth's tombstone at St Peter's Leckhampton, Cheltenham, includes a memorial to Emma with these words: "A good life has but a few days, but a good name endureth for ever." She was living with Alfred Smee in Finsbury Circus in 1861 and with Alfred Hutchison Smee in The Grange, Wallington,  in 1881. She died in Finsbury Circus in 1881.

 

Frederick Smee (1822-79)

 

He worked in the Bank of England and was an amateur pianist, organist, composer and collector of music. He played the organ at St Mary's, Stoke Newington. His compositions were mostly sacred music. His music collection included an autographed copy of Handel's opera Amadigi di Gaula and a rare copy of John Ravencroft's sonata a tre.

He married his first cousin, Katherine Ray Barker (1831-1921), in Norwich in 1854. She was the daughter of her mother's younger sister, Mary Ray, who had married John Barker in 1813. They had no children.

 

John Smee (1760-1836)

 

He described himself as “John Smee of the Exchequer, Westminster, Gentleman”. He was born and lived his life in London, mostly in Newington. His career started well but went downhill towards the end of his life. In 1797 he was employed in the Auditor’s Office of the Exchequer and he published a book about tax legislation. Before that he may have been a surveyor for the Crown and afterwards a stockbroker. He was a dealer in ales and porter in Covent Garden in 1800 when he was declared bankrupt. He guaranteed a loan to his sons in 1828, but they went bankrupt in 1829 and the guarantee was called. John could not pay and was sent to debtors’ prison until he was discharged on account of his age. He explained in his will that he could not leave anything to his beloved children, apart from household goods and clothes, because of his “very slender circumstances”.

 

He had seven children who survived to adulthood. The oldest, Mary Ann (b.1785), married a draper and moved to Dunstable after her children grew up. The youngest, Louisa Lockhart (1807-84), married a timber merchant. One of the sons, George Frederick (1794-1873), was a brewer and at least two of George Frederick’s sons went into a similar line of business as licensed victuallers. One of George Frederick’s grandsons emigrated to New Zealand in 1912 and started a colony of Smees in the Christchurch area of South Island. Another two of John’s sons, John (b.1796) and Edward Augustus (1798-1871), went into business together in 1828 as riband weavers, shawl warehousemen, and sellers of other products but went bankrupt after only a year.

After that Edward Augustus was a belt and brace maker, a linen draper and a painter and decorator and John was a commercial traveller. They lived in London.

 

Joseph Smee (1646-1717/18)

 

He was a barber and a free burgess in the Borough of Sudbury. He had three children, one of whom, Joseph Smee (1678-1747) succeeded him in the barber business.

 

Joseph Smee (1678-1747)

 

He was a barber and sergeant at mace in Sudbury. He was probably also a Burgess of the Borough of Sudbury. He had three wives and fourteen children over a period of 35 years. One of his sons by his second wife, William Smee (1726-1811), moved to London where he was a peruke (wig) maker and barber.

 

Joseph Smee (1756-1816)

 

He grew up in Chelsea but moved south of the river to Newington (modern Kennington) around 1780. He was a clerk in the Bank of England and he also ran a pottery, usually with a partner. He ran into financial difficulties, possibly stemming from the pottery business, although the expense of raising two families over many years cannot have helped. He was declared bankrupt in 1801 when he retired from the Bank of England at the age of 45. The Bank initially awarded him a pension, but rescinded the order and instead paid a smaller annuity directly to his wife. He lived in Wales after his second wife died but returned to London (Lambeth) in his last years.

 

His two marriages were to Mary Sparks (c1758-1788) in 1776 and Margaret Hobman (1767-1806) in 1790. Altogether he had twelve children in the two families over a period of 29 years. Two of the sons of his first marriage, William Smee (1777-1858) and Joseph Smee (born 1779), worked at the Bank of England. Two of the daughters of his second marriage, Elizabeth Hardy Smee (1793-1859) and Emma Smee (1803-1881), together ran a school in Cheltenham. His last child Charles was born in 1806 but alas Margaret died giving birth to him. Soon after that Joseph moved his family to Glasbury near Hay-on-Wye in Wales where he remained for a number of years. Charles died aged 2 in 1808 in Glasbury and his daughter Margaret Crosby Smee married Thomas Probert, a local butcher, in 1809 in Crickhowell. At some point Joseph moved back to London, to the parish of St Mary’s Lambeth. He died in 1816 and was buried next to his second wife Margaret at St Mary’s Newington.

 

Joseph Smee (born 1779)

 

He worked at the Bank of England for 15 years until he was pensioned in 1814 because of absence “in a state of mental imbecility and of whose recovery there are no hopes”. He was living in Newington in the early 1800s. There is no record of him after 1814.

 

By 1814 he had six children, one of whom may have died young because there is no subsequent record of him or her. All three sons went abroad. William Randolph Smee (1801-1870) went to Australia in 1836 where he was a teacher. John Alfred Smee (b.1805) went to the US or Canada and George Raincock Smee (b.1807) went to Tobago in the West Indies where he worked on a sugar plantation. William Randolph started a family of Australian Smees. We do not know whether the other two married or had children. One of Joseph’s two daughters, Elizabeth Arnold Smee (1803-1871), married Harvey Dickinson, a civil servant at the East India Company headquarters in London. The other daughter, Emily Lester Smee (1811-1864), did not marry.

 

William Smee (1726-1811)

 

He moved from Sudbury to London as a young man and settled in Chelsea where he rented a house in Royal Hospital Row from Earl Cadogan. He was a peruke (wig) maker and barber. He retained his connections to Suffolk: he and his son Joseph were freemen and electors of Sudbury and both voted there in the elections of 1790.

 

Although his wife was from Sudbury, he married her in London. They had five children, four of whom survived to adulthood, and started the London branch of the Smees who later became successful in the Bank of England and as scientists, and married into the Odling family. One of the two sons, Joseph Smee (1756-1816), was a clerk at the Bank of England. The other, John Smee (1760-1836), worked in the Auditor’s Office of the Exchequer but late in life spent time in debtors’ prison. Both sons had financial difficulties. William apparently disapproved of them as he favoured his grandson William, Joseph’s oldest son, over his own sons in his will.

 

William Smee (1777-1858)

 

William Smee spent his early years in Chelsea and moved with his father to Newington. Although admitted to Cambridge he had to withdraw because of his father’s financial difficulties. He worked in a bank for two years, then at his father’s pottery, until he joined the Bank of England in 1801. He moved up steadily in the Bank becoming Assistant Accountant in 1826, Deputy Accountant in 1828 and finally Chief Accountant in 1831. He was still the Chief Accountant when he died in 1858 at the age of 81. He was active in the general management of the Bank and also in City affairs, helping to found the Gresham Society, a life insurance company for people who found it difficult to find insurance elsewhere.

 

His wife Susannah Ray (1790-1849) came from Suffolk and they lived first in Camberwell until about 1830 when they moved to accommodation at the Bank of England. They had five children, one of whom died as an infant. Their only daughter died in 1842 when she was 21 years old. Their three surviving sons, William Ray Smee (1816-77), Alfred Smee (1818-77) and Frederick Smee (1822-79), all worked at the Bank of England. As William himself, his father Joseph Smee (1756-1816) and his brother Joseph Smee (b.1779) also worked at the Bank, there were three generations of Smees who worked there over a span of almost one hundred years. Moreover, they married into another Bank of England family, the Hutchisons. Alfred Smee’s wife, Elizabeth Hutchison, was the daughter of George Hutchison who, together with his brother William, had careers at the Bank.

 

William Randolph Smee (1801-1870)

 

He emigrated to Australia in 1836 and worked in Sydney at a church school where his wife also taught. He was a clerk at the church. According to letters from his sister in England, he had committed some “youthful follies” in England which created social stigma and might have been the reason for his emigration. The nature of the follies are unknown but might have been associated with his marriage to a married woman who already had a teenage daughter.

 

He had three sons, and a stepdaughter from his wife’s previous marriage, who continued the new line of Australian Smees, which included clergymen and teachers.

 

William Ray Smee (1816-77)

 

He joined the Bank of England in 1833 and stayed there until he took early retirement in 1853. While still in his 20s, he proposed a series of reforms that greatly improved the efficiency of the Cheque Office, the circulation department and the management of the National Debt. In 1850 he was appointed Secretary to the Committee of the Treasury which was the leading standing committee of the Court of Directors. It handled the most responsible business of the Bank and always included the most senior Bank figures. While at the Bank, he found time to write and publish short papers on topical financial and other issues. One about the reform of the income tax published in 1846 has received favourable comment from late 20th century economic historians because of its early attempt to estimate national income and its innovative proposal of a PAYE (Pay As You Earn) system for collecting taxes. His successful career at the Bank was suddenly cut short in 1852 when he was seriously injured in a railway accident and had to retire the following year. He continued to write pamphlets as well as letters to Ministers and The Times but without the originality or insight of his pamphlet on the income tax. He wrote a delusional letter to the Queen in 1859 in which he claimed that he was really the son of King George IV and was due to receive a large sum of money that was placed in trust for him with William Smee (his real father) who drugged and mistreated him. His delusions were presumably caused by the injuries he suffered in the railway accident, aggravated by the death of his father the year before and a dispute with his brothers over the will.

 

He married in July 1854 and had no children. From 1859, if not before, until his death in 1879, he lived in St Edmund’s Terrace in St John’s Wood on the edge of Primrose Hill Park.

 

John Thompson (1722- )

 

He may have come from Yorkshire. He was a Commissioner of H.M. Transports and had a prosperous rope manufacturing business in Shadwell. He married Rachel Butler (1733-87) of Warminster, with whom he had four sons and three daughters.

 

Edward Beaumont Venn (1781-1857)

 

He had eleven children with Harriet Green (1783-1855). The youngest, Margaretta Elfrida Venn (1825-91) married her cousin John Mellish Kay Hahn (1828-1907).

 

John Vodin (1695-1758)

 

The Vodin family originally came from Guernsey. John worked in the Navy Dockyard in Portsmouth as a shipwright, and received a testimonial of good service for his 38 years there.

 

Charles Walters (1792-1878)

 

He was an engineer and worked in France and Spain as well as England. He managed a screw manufacturing factory in Birmingham in the 1830s and retired to Bognor in the 1840s. He had six children who survived to adulthood, four boys and two girls, and only three grandchildren. The Walters name in his branch of the family did not survive beyond one granddaughter. Three of his sons worked in banking and finance and the fourth was an artist. All the children had comfortable lives and left significant sums in their wills.

 

Frederick Walters (1831-1907)

 

He was a merchant in London and Valparaiso, Chile, and was the director of several companies. He spent 2½ years in South Australia in his early years (his father was there in 1848-52). He was the Chilean Consul in Liverpool in 1868-78. His first wife was Chilean and died young. His second wife was English. He had two children with his first wife, Frederick Delano Walters and Teresa Walters; Teresa married a clergyman, Hugh Hamilton Flynn, in Bombay Cathedral. Frederick was the Walters family historian, and published his findings in The Family of Walters of Dorset, Hants (1907).

 

George Ranking Walters (1846-1918)

 

He was a banker and stockbroker. After retiring he lived in Bognor near his brother.

 

Gregory Seale Walters (1797-1876)

 

He worked as a merchant banker in the firm of A.A.Gower, Nephews and Co., starting as a clerk at age 18 and rising to partner. After the firm went bankrupt in the economic crisis of 1847-48, he went to Australia in 1848 on behalf of the Schneiders’ Patent Copper Company of London. He managed the PCC’s affairs in South Australia, including the establishment of a smelter, the Kooringa Copper Works, near the copper mine at Burra. He returned to London in or after 1852 and was appointed the first Agent-General of South Australia in London in 1858, a position he held until 1865. He had eight children with his wife, the former Johanna Huth, whose father had founded the merchant bank Frederick Huth and Co. and whose mother, Manuela Felipa Mayfren (1785-1856), might have been the illegitimate daughter of a member of the Spanish royal family. Manuela’s mother, Barbara Kastner, was a lady-in-waiting to Queen Marie Amelia of Saxony. She was married to Don Antonio Mayfren, but Manuela’s father might have been the Infante Gabriel of Spain (1752-88).

 

James Maxfield Walters (1830-87)

 

Following his grandfather, Thomas Walters, he was active in the Volunteer movement, a home defence organization, in 1858-60. He was a banker with the Oriental Bank Corporation in China, Japan and London. He retired to the family home in Bognor in the 1870s. His middle name, Maxfield, came from William Maxfield, who employed James’ aunt, Sarah Frances Harris as his housekeeper and married her in 1836 shortly before his death.

 

John Walters (died 1718)

 

He moved from Blandford, Dorset, to Portsea where his children were born and he died. Various possible antecedents are discussed in Frederick Walters, The Family of Walters of Dorset, Hants (1907).

 

John Walters (1782-1821)

 

He was an architect in London, living and practising in Fenchurch Buildings. St Paul’s, Shadwell, is the only surviving one of the three east London churches he designed. It was built in 1817-20 in Classical style. His other churches were in different styles: Palladian for the Auction Mart, Bartholomew Lane, London (1808-9, demolished), and Perpendicular for St Philip's chapel, Stepney (1818-20, demolished), He was also interested in naval architecture. His son Edward was also an architect.

 

Martin Rawlinson Walters (1838-1926)

 

He worked at the Bank of England. After his wife died in 1893, he moved to Bognor and lived in the family home, The Pavilion, Waterloo Square, at first with his brother Thomas and then on his own. His housekeeper was Miss Plumbley, known as Plumb.

 

Thomas Walters (1756-1825)

 

He was born in Portsea, Hampshire, and moved at the age of 14 to London where he was apprenticed to a ship’s chandler in Wapping. In 1776-80 he was in Pensacola, Florida, where he was involved in importing goods from England and served as secretary to General Johnson who commanded a troop of Royalist militia during the War of American Independence. He returned to Wapping in 1780 and was admitted to the Livery of the Merchant Taylors in 1783, at which time he was described as a biscuit maker. He may have been a partner of his wife’s uncle, Gregory Seale, in a bakery in Shadwell, next to Wapping. He named his son, Gregory Seale Walters, after his partner, and also gave his daughter, Jane Seale Walters, the same middle name. He was Warden of the Merchant Taylors in 1794-96. He was active in the Volunteer movement, a home defence organization, and in 1798 was Deputy Lieutenant of the Union Volunteers in the Tower Hamlets. He lived in Shadwell until early in the 19th century when he moved to Hackney. He married Anna Thompson (1758-1853) with whom he had eight children who survived to adulthood.

 

Thomas Walters (1832-1903)

 

He was an artist who, between 1856 and 1865, exhibited twice at the Royal Academy, and also at the British Institution and the Royal Society of British Artists. Together with his sister Anna, he lived with his parents in Bognor from the 1860s, and remained in the same house, The Pavilion, Waterloo Square, after they died.

 

William Watson (1770-1857)

 

He was a watch case maker. He married Mary Bayley (c1766-1821) the daughter of Barnard Bayley (c1738-1819) who was a watchmaker. Mary was a widow with two young children from her first marriage to George Bruin (1762-95), a coach painter. They lived in Cripplegate and Clerkenwell just north of the City. They had two more children together, Mary Ann Watson (1800-84) and Elizabeth Watson (b. c1802). Mary Ann married George Odling (1795-1872), a surgeon, and Elizabeth married Valentine Knight (1793-1867), a magistrate and landowner.

 

Edmund Woodthorpe (1814-87)

 

He was an architect and surveyor and designed and restored many buildings, mostly in London. His father, Henry Woodthorpe (1780-1842), was the Town Clerk of the City of London. He married Rosina Sarah Hahn (1822-91) with whom he had a son and a daughter. The son, Edmund Woodthorpe (1858-92) was also an architect and surveyor. In their later years Edmund and Rosina Sarah lived in Headley, Hants, as did her brother, Theophilus Sigismund Hahn (1824-1907). There are monumental inscriptions for the Woodthorpes and Hahns in Headley churchyard.